First Year Throwback

Here’s a thing I wrote for an old blog about my first final project in first semester of first year, which you can see here. Back then I did a write-up about every project after I was done, just for fun. Ah, those were the days. Anyway, here’s what first-year me wrote about the project:
This was the final project of the semester, and the first architectural environment we designed at human scale. We were given a hypothetical site 36’ long by 24’ wide, with a  6’ by 24’ by 1’ plane elevated at one end of the site 8’ off the ground plane. At the other end of the site, there’s a large monolithic mass 18’ by 18’ by 6’ thick. 
The assignment was to design an environment that would facilitate the passage of person traveling through the space from the elevated plane through an opening in the mass, or vice versa. At first I wanted to approach the project as if I was designing a temple, a type of space that often places an emphasis on passage or transition. the problem was a church, temple, cathedral, etc, is usually symmetrical in both plan and elevation along the building’s main axis. Symmetry expresses a kind of stillness or quietness that helps the space feel sacred or holy, but the symmetry trick is hard to pull off. I decided instead to do something asymmetrical, in order to make specific moments in time as one follows a path through the space become more important, and to ensure the experience of the space constantly changes as it is navigated.

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Throwback!

This was my model for the ‘transitional space’ project, my first final project, first semester, first year. You can read the bit I wrote about it for an old blog in this post.

I don’t like the ornament and clutter of most neoclassical buildings, but sometimes their geometry and tectonics are so much better than anything built now. 

study model in the garden.

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The carbon fiber pavilion by Alphonso Peluso and his students got an award and is one ArchDaily. Check it out here.

This was a study model for our design, which ended up getting rejected outright by the one of the professors, so it didn’t go much farther.